Citizen scientist Isa Brähler, doctoral student Moritz Müller, citizen scientist Joachim Hassel and project manager Katrin Moeller (from left to right) in the library of St. Mary’s Church where the original church records are kept.
© Michael Deutsch
20.10.2021 in Featured, Science, Research

Genealogy research for science

Isa Brähler and Joachim Hassel are gathering data from old church records as part of a citizen science project. Their efforts form the basis of the work being done by researchers at MLU to find out more about the marriages of 19th-century families in Halle. Their aim is to better understand social class structure at the time. Read more

A Europe-wide citizen science project deals with cowslip - Sabrina Träger coordinates the German-speaking part of it.
© karamba2106 / stock.adobe.com
20.10.2021 in Featured, Science, Research

Perceptual pitfalls

Data from citizen science projects are of great value for research but can potentially lead to skewed results. This was the finding of a study done in collaboration with the University of Halle. What does this mean for such projects? A conversation with co-author Professor Jonathan Chase and Dr Sabrina Träger, who coordinates the German part of a citizen science project on cowslip. Read more

Timo Faltus
© studioline Leipzig
20.10.2021 in Featured, Science, Research

What is allowed in citizen science?

Citizen science projects enrich science - but a clear legal framework has yet to be established. Therapy-oriented initiatives particularly need a defined ethical and legal research framework. Biologist and lawyer Dr Timo Faltus is currently working to establish this. Read more

Timo Niedermeyer with cyanobacteria that are being prepared for cultivation
© Markus Scholz
29.09.2021 in Science, Research

Hunt for the eagle killer

For decades, the cause of eagle deaths in the U.S. remained a mystery. With the help of Professor Timo Niedermeyer and his team, the crime story-like case was finally solved. In March, it became the cover story of the journal “Science”. Read more

Marion Schmicke (left) and Sandra Andres conducting research into bovine liver cells
© Maike Glöckner
22.04.2021 in Science, Research

The immortal liver cell

When animal testing is to be avoided, so-called “cell lines” are often used. They serve as a model for certain types of tissue. This has so far proven to be quite a challenge with bovine liver, as the cells are difficult to cultivate. A team of researchers from the University of Halle is looking to change that. Read more

Robert Paxton and Tabea Streicher place a temperature sensor in the beehive.
© Markus Scholz
22.04.2021 in Science, Research, Knowledge Transfer

Do sick bees buzz differently?

In a Europe-wide project, researchers are trying to find out when a bee colony is doing well. Prof. Robert Paxton's team is testing a digital beehive for this purpose. The weight, temperature and sounds of the colony will tell beekeepers the condition of their animals via an app. Read more

Juliana Martins de Souza e Silva can use a virtual reality headset to “fly” through tiny samples of materials.
© Michael Deutsch
31.03.2021 in Science, Research

The researcher who flies through nanoworlds

The University of Halle has a special, state-of-the-art X-ray microscope that can be used to image tiny samples in 3D. This allows the structure of materials to be studied in great detail. It’s an exciting technology that is also in demand outside Halle and one that has prompted Dr Juliana Martins de Souza e Silva to make a declaration of love. Read more

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